About the Object

Name: SN 1987A
Distance: 168000 light years
Constellation: Dorado
Category: NIRCam

Coordinates

Position (RA):5 35 28.16
Position (Dec):-69° 16' 15.67"
Field of view:0.13 x 0.12 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 15.7° left of vertical



Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Infrared 1.5 μmJames Webb Space Telescope
NIRCam
Infrared 2.0 μmJames Webb Space Telescope
NIRCam
Infrared
Fe II
1.64 μmJames Webb Space Telescope
NIRCam
Infrared 3.22 μmJames Webb Space Telescope
NIRCam
Infrared
Br-alpha
4.05 μmJames Webb Space Telescope
NIRCam
Infrared 4.44 μmJames Webb Space Telescope
NIRCam

SN 1987A (NIRCam image)

The NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope has begun the study of one of the most renowned supernovae, SN 1987A (Supernova 1987A). Located 168,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, SN 1987A has been a target of intense observations at wavelengths ranging from gamma rays to radio for nearly 40 years, since its discovery in February of 1987. New observations by Webb’s NIRCam (Near-Infrared Camera) provide a crucial clue to our understanding of how a supernova develops over time to shape its remnant.

This image reveals a central structure like a keyhole. This center is packed with clumpy gas and dust ejected by the supernova explosion. The dust is so dense that even near-infrared light that Webb detects can’t penetrate it, shaping the dark “hole” in the keyhole.

A bright, equatorial ring surrounds the inner keyhole, forming a band around the waist that connects two faint arms of hourglass-shaped outer rings. The equatorial ring, formed from material ejected tens of thousands of years before the supernova explosion, contains bright hot spots, which appeared as the supernova’s shock wave hit the ring. Now spots are found even exterior to the ring, with diffuse emission surrounding it. These are the locations of supernova shocks hitting more exterior material.

In this image blue represents light at 1.5 microns (F150W), cyan 1.64 and 2.0 microns (F164N, F200W), yellow 3.23 microns (F323N), orange 4.05 microns (F405N), and red 4.44 microns (F444W).

Credit:

NASA, ESA, CSA, M. Matsuura (Cardiff University), R. Arendt (NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center & University of Maryland, Baltimore County), C. Fransson (Stockholm University), J. Larsson (KTH Royal Institute of Technology), A. Pagan (STScI)

About the Image

Id: SN1987a-1
Type: Observation
Release date: 31 August 2023, 16:00
Size: 1077 x 1050 px


Image Formats

Large JPEG 158.3 KB
Screensize JPEG 114.1 KB

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Wallpapers

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1280x1024 171.0 KB
1600x1200 213.3 KB
1920x1200 231.3 KB
2048x1536 293.6 KB

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